Friday, July 31, 2015

Zap

A little view of the front yard as a storm dropped down from the north west.

©2015 Steve Borichevsky

Be sure to visit Skywatch Friday this week.

Thursday, July 30, 2015

Female Meadowhawks

The first two dragonflies are Autumn Meadowhawks that were shot here in Essex County, Massachusetts.

©2015 Steve Borichevsky

©2015 Steve Borichevsky

This is dragonfly is most likely a Ruby Meadowhawk.

©2015 Steve Borichevsky

American Goldfinch

©2015 Steve Borichevsky

©2015 Steve Borichevsky

©2015 Steve Borichevsky

And just because I cannot help myself, here is a female Blue Dasher

©2015 Steve Borichevsky

Tuesday, July 28, 2015

White-breasted Nuthatches

We have a family of White-breasted Nuthatches in the yard. I’m always happy to have them around. They make good neighbors.
©2015 Steve Borichevsky
©2015 Steve Borichevsky
©2015 Steve Borichevsky
©2015 Steve Borichevsky
Be sure to check out Wild Bird Wednesday this week!

Monday, July 27, 2015

Female Meadowhawk

Saturday was a bit windy and cool so I was surprised to find any dragons out. I found a few.

©2015 Steve Borichevsky©2015 Steve Borichevsky

Sunday, July 26, 2015

I found a new dragon!

I was fairly excited to find this dragonfly a week ago a week ago in Ipswich, Massachusetts. The best guess that I have is that it is a female Ashy Clubtail. The second choice would be a Dusky Clubtail, my books tell me that it is best determined “in the hand”.

©2015 Steve Borichevsky

This female has been through a great deal. Her wings are missing bits and pieces.

©2015 Steve Borichevsky

©2015 Steve Borichevsky

This dragonfly was about 100 yards away from the Ipswich river.

Just for fun, here is a female Blue Dasher.

©2015 Steve Borichevsky

Saturday, July 25, 2015

American Redstart

This is one of my nemesis species. I’ve botched so many American Redstart photos that is isn’t funny. I was walking along a deep woods path to one of my favorite dragon locations. I could hear a Black-and-white Warbler in a nearby tangle. Then up popped this guy about 20 feet from me!

©2015 Steve Borichevsky

©2015 Steve Borichevsky

He grabbed a bug and headed out for the nest. While I was waiting for the B&W Warbler to come out, the  Redstart came back! He flew right in my direction, about two feet away from my face as he went over to the other side of the path. I was able to get two half-decent shots out of about ten.

Later that day, I ran into my other nemesis. The Belted Kingfisher. I threw away about 80% of the pixels to get these pictures. Bear with me, sometimes I will post a shot like this just to change my luck with a species.

©2015 Steve Borichevsky©2015 Steve Borichevsky

Friday, July 24, 2015

Gypsy Moth

©2015 Steve BorichevskyI was walking along the Ipswich River in Ipswich, Massachusetts and found these moths. I was feeling quite excited to find a new bug. They seemed to be everywhere. When I got home, my excitement was diminished by learning that what we are looking at there are Gypsy Moths. The This bug is native to Europe, Asia and North Africa.

I have walked in the woods of Vermont and Massachusetts for nearly all of my life I’ve never seen these, but as a boy I knew of them and their destruction.

The Gypsy Moth was brought here to the United States by Professor E. Leopold Trouvelot in the 1860s. He was trying to identify and breed a silkworm species that would survive in North America.

Interestingly enough, Trouvelot was breeding Gypsy Moths in his back yard. He noted that some of the larva escaped and he knew that this would have dire consequences. He tried to alert a local entomologist, but no steps were taken to divert the disaster.

In 1890, the first outbreaks started. The effect of these outbreaks is that whole forests become defoliated by the caterpillars. The preferred target are oak trees, however other deciduous hardwoods are attacked and they will even attack pines if the hardwoods are not available. 

Did I mention that this all started in Medford, Massachusetts? You can read more about this on the USDA Forest Service web site.

Female

©2015 Steve Borichevsky

 

The male moth has plumose antennae to detect the sex pheromone emitted by the female.

©2015 Steve Borichevsky


After mating, the female lays eggs in a single mass covered with hairs from the abdomen. Most egg masses are located on tree trunks. The winter is spent in the egg stage. In the spring the eggs will hatch and the larva will climb up to the tops of the trees and suspend by a strand and wait for the wind to take them to a new location.

©2015 Steve Borichevsky

©2015 Steve Borichevsky

©2015 Steve Borichevsky

Thursday, July 23, 2015

Eastern Kingbird

I came upon this Eastern Kingbird on a fence wire and was lucky enough to get to watch him for a little while.

©2015 Steve Borichevsky

©2015 Steve Borichevsky

Wednesday, July 22, 2015

Walking around on an overcast day

An overcast day can be a good time to shoot. I found a Mulberry Wing

©2015 Steve Borichevsky©2015 Steve Borichevsky

Dragonflies may not be out on an overcast day, but if you can find them, then it is a great opportunity to get photos without the blown out catch light spot in the eyes.

©2015 Steve Borichevsky

Northern Crescent

©2015 Steve Borichevsky

Tuesday, July 21, 2015

Mulberry Tree

I have a special post today. All of these images are tied together by a single Mulberry tree. This year the bugs are very light and I have been able to spend some early morning time capturing the birds that visit this tree.

Northern Mockingbird

©2015 Steve Borichevsky

American Robin

©2015 Steve Borichevsky

Gray Catbird

©2015 Steve Borichevsky

Male Baltimore Oriole

©2015 Steve Borichevsky

Female Baltimore Oriole

©2015 Steve Borichevsky

Juvenile Baltimore Oriole

©2015 Steve Borichevsky

Cedar Waxwing

©2015 Steve Borichevsky

Male Rose-breasted Grosbeak

©2015 Steve Borichevsky

Female Rose-breasted Grosbeak

©2015 Steve Borichevsky

Red-bellied Woodpecker

©2015 Steve Borichevsky

House Finch

©2015 Steve Borichevsky

Be sure to visit Wild Bird Wednesday this week

Monday, July 20, 2015

Hairy Woodpecker with Mulberry

We do not get many Hairy Woodpeckers here in Ipswich. This year I noticed that a female spent the winter and this is the first time that I have seen a male. He was poaching mulberries from the tree. Here he is in the morning light trying to get the mulberry down.

©2015 Steve Borichevsky

©2015 Steve Borichevsky

©2015 Steve Borichevsky

Sunday, July 19, 2015

Eine Kleine Nactpost, Blue Dasher

I have so much material to post so just for fun, here is another dragonfly that I shot earlier this morning.

Blue Dasher, female

©2015 Steve Borichevsky

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