Saturday, November 30, 2013

A little local color

I took a drive into Gloucester today to see what local color I could find. Here is a dory tied up at the Maritime Heritage Center.

©2013 Steve Borichevsky

A bow shot just for fun.

©2013 Steve Borichevsky

Thursday, November 28, 2013

Happy Thanksgiving to you.

©2012 Steve Borichevsky

In the Unites States, today is our day of Thanksgiving. When I look at a wild turkey, I don’t see a black bird. No, I see a bird of may colors.

Wednesday, November 27, 2013

Tuesday, November 26, 2013

Monday, November 25, 2013

You should know where your cider comes from.

I do. Yes, I do enjoy a good mulled cider and rum. Here in Ipswich, I can get my cider locally.

©2013 Steve Borichevsky

The apple season in winding down here in Massachusetts. I was able to by apples for $0.99/lb. Russell Orchards last day is going to be the first of December.

©2013 Steve Borichevsky

©2013 Steve Borichevsky

©2013 Steve Borichevsky

Be sure to visit Our World Tuesday this week.

Sunday, November 24, 2013

Ipswich

Ipswich, Massachusetts has a very high density of Colonial era architecture. We have some houses that date back to the mid seventeenth century.

©2013 Steve Borichevsky

©2013 Steve Borichevsky©2013 Steve Borichevsky

Red, white and blue, Gloucester style and a rant on psychology

©2013 Steve Borichevsky
untitled-12 February 22, 2012-185I have had something on my mind since I had a conversation with my daughter about her college curriculum. It seems that in order for her to get here degree, she needs to take two semesters of psychology.

The price of a college education is at an all time high. Yet the quality of the education, in my opinion is not keeping pace with the expense. Compound that with being forced to endure the exposure to two semester completely useless data further demonstrates that the college and university systems in the United States are broken.

Let’s agree on one premise. When you go to the store and pay money for a product, you expect it to be what you paid for. Education should follow the same model. It is not that I think that there are useful subjects and useless subjects. No, folks should be able to study what interests them. Liberal arts, healing arts, engineering, biology, humanities. It’s all good stuff. Psychology, now that is where I draw the line.

Psychology advertises itself as a science. It is not. Psychology and psychiatry present themselves as subjects that help mankind. They have fallen way short of this to the point where they only exist today because of government subsidies.

Where am I coming from? When I was young, about 12 years old, I thought it would be a good idea to become a psychologist. I had a genuine interest in helping people. I started to get my first exposure in high school when I started to read psychology books. I began to smell a rat when I noticed that there were lots of names for classifications of disorders but the therapy sections were, well, missing.

Look at it this way. If you had a car that was was stalling in traffic, you would take it to a mechanic. Right? What would you think of the mechanic if he said that the car was suffering from Fuel Injector Fistula Disorder and handed you a bill without fixing the car? You would feel like you were taken for a fool. Why is it any different with a psychologist?

I had friends majoring in psychology who were learning how to run rats through mazes. Why? “Because we can learn about how man behaves by studying rats.” Which is another facet to my rant. Psychologist and psychiatrists believe that man is not only an animal, but that man can be understood by shocking rats in mazes.

If running animal experiments was the only problem then the solution would be to get them shut down on animal cruelty charges and we would be rid of them. No, that’s not really what the problem is. Starting in the 1950s they have managed to weasel their way into leaning institutions by promoting themselves as “the experts”. (I’m sorry, I really didn’t mean to insult weasels.) Now kids line up for Ritalin instead of milk.

Here is the word origin of psychology: (n.) 1650s, "study of the soul," from Modern Latin psychologia, probably coined mid-16c. in Germany by Melanchthon from Latinized form of Greek psykhe- "breath, spirit, soul" (see psyche) + logia "study of" (see -logy). Meaning "study of the mind" first recorded 1748, from Christian Wolff's "Psychologia empirica" (1732). It is no secret that psychology denies the spirituality side of man. Not only is the subject off the track, but it has fallen off a cliff and is still pulling cars off the track.

Psychologist do not study the spirit. To a psychologist, there is no spirit. A psychiatrists does not heal the soul. To them, there is no soul. Well, what the hell are they doing then?

Saturday, November 23, 2013

Scituate Light

There is a nice lighthouse down in Scituate, Massachusetts that I should go down and shoot again sometime.

Scituate Lighthouse 11-6-2010 2-08-45 PM

Scituate Lighthouse 11-6-2010 2-58-44 PM

Friday, November 22, 2013

Thursday, November 21, 2013

The Terrible Tug

Not a bad photo. It’ll never hang in the MET, but the purpose of this photo is more documentary than fine art. Not everyone gets to see this kind of scene and it shows what goes on here in Gloucester.  And that’s what makes it fun.

©2013 Steve Borichevsky

But what is not apparent is how an image like this is made. Yes, I said “made” as opposed to “taken”. Let’s break this down.

I arrived at the Gloucester Marine Railways Ship Yard at about 3:00 PM to see what images could be found. I could see a tug up on the railway and thought that I may be able to get an image or two from it. The challenge was the shadow across the hull of the ship put the darks in the shadows and the masts from the schooner Adventure sticking out of the aft deck of the tug just looked out of place.

©2013 Steve Borichevsky

I was pretty confident that the D600 could capture the scene and I could make an image out of it, but the masts are just too distracting out of their proper context. So I walked around the tug and took this shot. This is the RAW image, straight out of the camera. Let’s make it a bit more interesting.

©2013 Steve Borichevsky

I use Adobe Lightroom quite extensively. Love it. I’m not much of a Photoshop guy. I have Photoshop Elements and detest it. They’ve simplified it so much that it doesn’t makes sense. In my dotage, I’m going to learn Photoshop. For now, I use Elements if I need to stick some text somewhere. But I’ve digressed and since I’m not in my dotage just yet, I better get back on topic.

First, I have some standard workflow corrections that I do. This was taken with my D600 and my 24-85mm kit lens. My standard work flow starts with the lens correction, add some sharpness, a little saturation and vibrance. That only takes me so far. The image below still has a lot of problems but since I shot it in RAW, I can be fearless with the light.

©2013 Steve Borichevsky

The next step is to knock down the highlights. This brings out the color of the sky.

©2013 Steve Borichevsky

Next I bring the values of the shadows up so the detail comes out.

©2013 Steve Borichevsky

In order to give the photo more depth, I’ll turn down the black tones. This is a subtle change.

©2013 Steve Borichevsky

This lens always needs a little Clarity punch, so I’ve increased the Clarity. This gives the image more detail by putting contrast into the details.

©2013 Steve Borichevsky

Now my D600 sensor suffers from some stuck dust. This really becomes apparent when the lens is stopped down (smaller aperture). I did some spot removal and dodged some of the hot-spots in the background.

©2013 Steve Borichevsky

And there you go. I have not attempted to teach you Lightromm in this post. They main objective is to get you to consider stretching you boundaries if you are not shooting RAW. There are many photo editing packages out there. I think the Lightroom is a great value and I got a third part book and watch some on-line tutorials to get me launched.

It is a myth that working with RAW files is difficult and time consuming. (It took me about 52 seconds to rework this image.) You do have to learn some skills but it can open some new avenues for you. If you shoot JPG and you have your exposure off by more than a stop, you’re done. RAW gives is much more forgiving and you can be off by as many as 4 stops! Otherwise, the photo above would have to be edited in the camera, which is no fun!

Wednesday, November 20, 2013

Rust

First, let me orient you to what you are looking at. Back in the day they tried to tie the blocks of granite together with wrought iron. Iron and the sea can only lead to one outcome. Rust.  Although it was only 2:30 in the afternoon, the sun was hitting the iron at a fairly shallow angle.

©2013 Steve Borichevsky

©2013 Steve Borichevsky

©2013 Steve Borichevsky

©2013 Steve Borichevsky

Catch some other abstracts today!

Tuesday, November 19, 2013

“Can I eat that?”

Gulls. If you ever wonder what goes on inside a gull’s mind, stop wondering. The only thing that a gull is concerned with is, “Can I eat it?”

With that in mind, I shot two gulls sitting on net reels.  Below are a Herring Gull and a Great Black-backed Gull.

©2013 Steve Borichevsky

©2013 Steve Borichevsky

©2013 Steve Borichevsky

Be sure to visit Wild Bird Wednesday this week.

Monday, November 18, 2013

Lane’s Cove at low tide

Continuing with yesterday’s series from Lanesville, three more images from Lane’s Cove.

©2013 Steve Borichevsky

©2013 Steve Borichevsky

©2013 Steve Borichevsky

Be sure to visit Our World Tuesday this week.

Sunday, November 17, 2013

The Wall

Four distinctly different images of the same subject. This is the sea wall that protects Lane’s Cove in the hamlet of Lanesville in Gloucester.

©2013 Steve Borichevsky

©2013 Steve Borichevsky

©2013 Steve Borichevsky

©2013 Steve Borichevsky

Friday, November 15, 2013

Forgotten Photo Friday, California Sea Lions

I don’t know if I’ll make it out to Monterey Bay this year. There is nothing more exciting than getting access to wildlife. And getting up close and personal with a bunch of grumpy, noisy, smelly sea lions is just a great time. I cold spend hours here but it’s not everyone’s cup of tea. So I generally get about 15 to 20 minutes to get the shots.

©2013 Steve Borichevsky

©2013 Steve Borichevsky

©2013 Steve Borichevsky

Thursday, November 14, 2013

The Outbuilding

There is an old outbuilding by the side of the road in Ipswich that I’ve had my eye on for about four years now. I’ve always thought that it would make an interesting image in the fall. I’ve finally had good light, good foliage and the right amount of carpeting to get the shot that I want. Driving down the road, this is the first view that you will see it.

©2013 Steve Borichevsky

But it just gets better as you go by.

©2013 Steve Borichevsky

And then you go by.

©2013 Steve Borichevsky

Yes, I will visualize a shot, sometimes years in advance. This little photo shoot allows me to get my attention onto something else. Mission accomplished.

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