Tuesday, July 22, 2014

The Last Two Oysters, Death of a Family Business

We spent a week in Morin County, California. We saw signs all over the place, “Save our Drakes Bay Oyster Farm”. What’s this all about? I decided to look for myself. So I took a drive out to Point Reyes National Seashore and I found Drakes Bay.

Three hours before I arrived, the Supreme Court of the Unites States decided not to hear the case launched by Drakes Bay Oyster Farm to save their family business. The National Park Service, showing the same lack of intelligence as the Bureau of Land Management under James Watt, has done a great wrong.

©2014 Steve Borichevsky

These were the last two oysters sold at Drakes Bay on the day the last card was played by the government, demonstrating that our elected and appointed officials are fully incapable of assimilating data and make sound decisions.

©2014 Steve Borichevsky

A family business, fully sustainable with a positive environmental impact was forced to close.

©2014 Steve Borichevsky

We see the government closing down fishermen here on the east coast, further demonstrating that if you do not have a small army of layers to do you dirty work, you are at risk.

©2014 Steve Borichevsky

I asked them, “What is your recourse at this point?” After eight years of litigation, they are done. There is no recourse. Local jobs are gone. A family that held the land in stewardship is out of business. On July 31st, the doors will close forever.

I was told I could go anywhere on the property I wanted to, except on the docks. “We are not allowed to repair our infrastructure, so it is not safe for the public.” Since they were under court orders, they had not been able to repair their docs for years.

©2014 Steve Borichevsky

The oyster farm had a positive impact on the land and the environment. It was stated when Point Reyes became a part of the National Parks Service, that the oyster farming and dairy farming would be preserved. Oyster farming, a proper use of a great resource. The land on Point Reyes is dotted with dairy farms. These farmers should be nervous. My prediction is that they will be next.

I talked with restaurateurs and locals. I did not meet one person who agreed with the National Parks Service on this. With all the people I talked to, one would think I would have heard something bad. Okay, I didn’t talk to anyone in the Park Service. Why should I? They have already demonstrated a lack of ability assimilate and process data correctly. But think for yourself and make your own decision.

©2014 Steve Borichevsky

How were the oysters? Damned tasty! I’m not an oyster person, but I ordered them three times that week.

Sunday, July 20, 2014

I’m back!

I’m back, but you probably didn’t miss me. We’ve been out of town for three weeks. I put up three weeks of content before leaving! Thank you all for continuing to check in. I had two weeks of vacation, one in Bolinas, California and another in Princeville, Hawaii plus a third week of working at our home offices in Santa Clara, California. We took the red-eye back to Boston from Oakland, California last night and touched down at 9:00am Boston time this morning. Needless to say, I’m jet-lagged.

Below is a beach on the north end of Kawai. It was just the quintessential island paradise.  We didn’t have trouble finding locations that were peaceful and not over-run.

©2014 Steve Borichevsky

©2014 Steve Borichevsky

Saturday, July 19, 2014

Ash-throated Flycatcher in a Creosote Bush

I had an opportunity to spend five minutes with an Ash-throated Flycatcher in Palm Springs, California last April.

©2014 Steve Borichevsky

©2014 Steve Borichevsky

©2014 Steve Borichevsky

©2014 Steve Borichevsky

©2014 Steve Borichevsky

©2014 Steve Borichevsky

Thursday, July 17, 2014

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